Walking in Scotland is a great way to see some of the magnificent scenery and unique sights. In Scotland there are 282 Munros. (These are mountains over 3000 feet high and named after Sir Hugo Munro). There are also Corbett’s and Grahams too which are smaller mountains.

Not only do you see the scenery but there is a lot of history to be discovered too! Loch Lomond is very picturesque with opportunities to hire boats and go out on the loch or take the history walking trail or if you’re looking for a challenge, the ascent up Ben Lomond.

The bonnie banks of Loch Lomond.

The bonnie banks of Loch Lomond.

The area by Loch Lomond – Ardess was once owned by Rob Roy between 1711 and 1713 and is on the West Highland Way. The West Highland Way is one of the longest linear walking paths in Scotland connecting Milngavie just outside Glasgow to Fort William.

Loch Lomond is easily accessible by car from Glasgow and central Scotland.

Ben Lomond stands at 974 metres and the name coming from the Gaelic word loam meaning ‘beacon’ or ‘blaze of light’. This is one of the most southern Munros in Scotland. Walking up Ben Lomond is not an easy fought, with steep inclines and the dramatics of the weather. The air is clean and clear, starting with the musty woodland, and then the astringent aromas giving tell of the farm animals on the hills, heading higher to crisper notes. Some of the flora and fauna that can be seen includes the pink common spotted orchid and the yellow bog asphodel plants. You might also spot the ptarmigan bird and watch out for the adders!

Spectacular views from Ben Lomond.

Spectacular views from Ben Lomond.

The light pollution is at a minimum, on a clear night you get a great view of the stars. It’s a very romantic setting siting on the bonnie banks with the twinkling light from above, the wind whistling through the trees, creaking of the branches and the rustling of the leaves.

In the spring the woodland floor is quilted with bluebells, in the height of summer the hills are covered in Scottish heather and then in fall the foliage ranging from bright yellows through to dark reds is spectacular.

There is a variety of accommodation available ranging from hotels on the loch, Inn’s, homely guest house’s, wooden chalet’s and budget accommodation in either the youth hostel or lodge house.

On a crisp clear night after stargazing you can warm up in the lodge house with the wood burning stove, mesmerised by its hypnotic flames and the crackling of the wood.

There are ancient remains of dwellings called Crannogs around the Loch. If you would like to see and hear more why not visit the Crannog Centre in Kenmore.   On route to Kenmore why not visit the quaint village of Balquhidder, where you can visit the burial place of Rob Roy.

In the quaint town of Balquhidder lies the resting place of Rob Roy.

In the quaint town of Balquhidder lies the resting place of Rob Roy.

Come see and hear about some of Scotland’s unique history and discover its niche escapes.  Have you climbed Ben Lomond, visited Loch Lomond? We would love to hear what your highlights were.

About The Author

I am a travel photographer and writer with green fingers based in Edinburgh. The love of travel has allowed me to gain my sea legs on-board luxury cruise ships, camp out under the stars and drive a corvette to visit a volcano in Hawaii. These are some of the travel highlights I have been lucky to experience. I am very excited to be working with Niche Escapes to inspire you to travel and have your own unique experiences.